Lee Ritcher – The Power of Collaboration

About LEE RITCHER

Lee Richter is an award-winning business innovator and global visionary recognized recently by the San Francisco Business Times as one of their Top 100 Women Business Leaders for the seventh year running. In addition, she has been featured on the list of the Top 100 Fastest-Growing Businesses in the San Francisco Bay Area for the past two years.

As the CEO of multiple companies, a #1 best-selling author, an Abundance Studios™ Producer, and a member of the Forbes Business Council, Lee’s passion is to connect with innovative leaders making a global impact. As an entrepreneur since the 1990s, Lee has built and sold several multi-million dollar companies. Lee loves collaborating and creating value in the global marketplace. Her new venture is launching a pet health moonshot.

Most importantly, Lee is a loving and devoted wife and mother. With Lee’s help, her daughter Abbey became a best-selling author at the age of 9 with her first of five books published. Lee’s husband, Dr. Gary Richter, has become recognized as a global thought leader in the veterinary industry for his expertise in holistic health for pets, and was voted America’s Favorite Veterinarian. Lee and her family love to travel and explore the world together.
Bio Source: goasklee.com

Transcript:

Alan
So let’s talk about this last year with COVID. And how that has helped change the way that PR works. How have you adjusted to this marketplace when the world has been shutting down and isolating individuals? How have you adapted?

Lee
That is a great question. And actually at the very beginning of COVID, one of the very first topics that we had in our Genius Network and in other networks that I’m in is we all have to adapt right now. We were all in it together, we knew we had to adapt and people that are internet marketers and people that are in the PR and marketing world, a lot of us were used to doing events in person, right? We were used to you know, having dinners together and collaborating and masterminding together. And immediately we knew we still wanted the connection. However, we had to transform it into an online experience. And people like Dan Sullivan became masters at zoom. And actually just the other day, I was on a call with Dan. And he said you know what, I really like the zoom thing, I want to do more of it because I get the effect of connecting with my favorite people. And I don’t have to travel. And it’s immediate, and no one’s complaining. And the cost is the right amount. And we’re all absolutely joyful together. And so I think you and I get to multiply that in our universe as well. So when I’m looking at my businesses in the pet world, I’m seeing Wow, COVID really could have changed that a lot because they’re seeing people in person every day. And looking back. Luckily, our team managed it, we were open every day, our team stayed healthy, they had healthy habits, we fed their mind, body and spirit with love, joy and connection not only through animals, but through one another. And so by being intentional about that we all connected and stayed healthy and happy together. So I’m looking back and saying we’re thriving. And a lot of it starts with our mindset and the rest starts with intention.

Alan
In the, in your world of PR you’ve you mastered the art of collaboration how has collaboration helped you in getting messages out?

Lee
So I’m a person that comes in and I can see genius that the simplifier is doing. And the simplifier is that people that you know, like Gino Wickman. If you look at Gino Wickman, he wrote the book traction. He is a simplifier. And he collaborates with Mark C Winters. And they wrote the book rocket fuel together. And they’re in our group together and I get to see behind the scenes their intentions, right. But these are two simple fires that are brilliant at taking complex concepts, and drilling it down to bite sized pieces that people can implement step one, step two, step three, step four. So they’re great at simplifying and coming up with this brilliant content. And then at the right time, if you bring a multiplier, like when you bring the multiplier in, and that multiplier says not only do I believe in what you’re doing and how it’s effective and adding greatness to either the workflow or our my lifestyle or whatever, not only do I believe in it, but I want the world to know about it. Now I’m the multiplier that comes in just at the right time and says, Let’s go tell the world about it. Right now, their biggest multiplier is probably Amazon, Amazon selling 100 of their books every day when they’re not even talking about it anymore. They’re on to their new projects. But they have a collaborator named Amazon, right, who’s selling their books on a regular basis. But they also have collaborators like Dan Sullivan, who tell people to take their EOS and to go through their courses because he and his company do. So now that’s another collaborator who’s not only collaborating and learning but then bringing a referral source to them as well. So I think when I’m looking at coding Operators I’m looking at what? Who is the right who for what I need right now, right? So me, as the CEO of my companies, I have two pieces of my job. Number one is that division. Number two is finance division. That’s my job set division, finance division, second division, finance division, as a PR marketing person, which is 80% of what I do as the leader of my company. I’m telling the world about it. Right at just the right time, I’m taking the genius from my team. And I’m telling the world about it. And I think that’s, that’s really valuable is looking at collaboration of what do you need in your pipeline? What are you strong at that you can take hold of and run with? And then what do you have weaknesses that are or needs that you can fill with other who’s and then they can be the collaborators to help you to the next spot? I will say, I learned something really valuable from Dan Sullivan, about collaboration recently. Can I share that with you?

Alan
Absolutely.

Lee
So in his book, who not how he talks about how he collaborates with Ben Hardy, who’s a PhD, he was number one writer and medium, absolutely brilliant, huge amount of following, and an incredible writer, and he has Tucker Max, who owns a company called scribe, and Tucker Max is a multiplier, because he has a company that not only will publish the book in the simplifier way of creating chapters and content worthy of sharing, but then his company’s also multiplier, which tells the world about how great the book is, and, and you should have it on your shelves as well. And maybe they collaborate with Amazon and other things, other collaborators as well. And what happens is, Dan Sullivan looks and says, You know what, I can’t really hire those two people, but I can collaborate with them. And when I collaborate with them, I can have even better results. Because Ben Hardy’s, not hireable, he’s doing his own writing. But as a collaborator, what Dan brings to the table was he showed Ben, a side of Dan that nobody else gets to see because here they were collaborators and writing a book and giving value together. And then the other side of it is they had the multiplier with scribe not only getting it written and published, but then out to the public. So now Dan taught us collaborate with people that you honestly could not even afford to hire or wouldn’t have access to hire. But they’re phenomenal collaborators, and you bring something worthy to them. And so what Dan did was he said, as the writer and as the publisher, I’m not going to ask for any revenue share on anything, what I’m going to ask for is, you guys keep the money of everything you do. But yet give me access to your brain to be my collaborator. And what Dan has gotten from that is more than 50 new clients into his coaching program. Because of how the book was written, people could see themselves in the journey. And because of the collaboration through an excellent writer, and an excellent publisher, more people see it. So the more people that see it, a percentage of them are the right fit for him. So now the whole equation works great for all three partners. And I don’t want to call it a win win win. What I want to call it is a collaboration, good, good, good. And even better together. Right? All of them are good, but together, they’re even better. And I think it doesn’t have to be about sharing anything other than our collaborative, creative spirit to elevate each other. Right? Which is what they did. Did they put their sweat and tears in it? Yes. Did he write better than ever, because Dan’s name was going to be on the book, Ben Hardy was the best writer I’ve ever seen. He interviewed me, I’ve made it in the book. And part of that reason is, is it meant so much to him to tell the stories that would actually make the most progress for all three of them? Meaning Dan, and Tucker Max, and Ben Hardy, because the three of them were the collaborators first, and all three of them, what did they do? They looked at the audience and they said, How do we make sure that they have a journey worthwhile? And that’s what they’re seeing. Now, they did in multiple ways, because they’ve sold over 100,000 of those books. They went on, I think the Wall Street Journal list, at least, if not more, and they’ve broken all these records, bigger records than they ever imagined, because they all thought about thought about the journey of the client and the reader. And it was multiplied. So I love that you asked that question because through collaboration, not only is it really incredible to see it multiply, but the energetic effect of seeing the success and also our friends mentoring the world, these are our personal friends, and they’re having an effect that’s rippling out to hundreds of 1,000’s if not millions of people now and they’re just real people to us. We get to see their journey behind the scenes we get to see what was it like for Ben hardy to be up all night editing while his wife is you know, getting ready to have their next child you know, he’s managing life and he’s managing the book and, and Dan Sullivan and Tucker Max, but he got it done. But he was a real person who needed support in in the interim. He absolutely is he Human being just like you and me, it’s not just a superhero in a lot of ways which he is, and a super dad. But in that moment, he was real. He was real as he was real with Dan Sullivan, he was real with Joe polish, he was real with his friends and said, this is really hard work, my, my heart is into it so much. And I love that because when the book came out, we could feel it, because their collaboration meant so much to each other, they showed up in the highest integrity for each other.

Alan
In this world of collaboration, you can look at the orchestra that they’re made up of single instruments, but you being given to bring them together, and combined force will create a symphony, which is powerful. They’re creating music, in harmony and different strains of tones. But ultimately, it delivers something much more powerful than any individual instrument could bring. I thought about the pandemic, pandemic is, is putting us all through a period of tribulation, it’s not one person it’s every buddy together, everybody feels the anxiety, everybody feels to change. And so the examples that you brought about the power of collaboration, the interesting thing there is there was a common thread of it wasn’t one person dominating the other, like, hire me as your client, but at that top level with the energy of CO creators. That there they become that Symphony, and they deliver results far beyond what they could individually, I want to move into handling, handling change, the PR, the delivery of messages when you bring on a client, and you brought some good examples of how you collaborate and you have different communities. But in today’s world when a client comes to you, Lee and says, Hey, Lee, can you help me identify who my target audience is? How do you address that?

Unknown Speaker
There’s, there’s 13 different ways that I connect with my ideal clients right now. Right? Ironically, there’s 13 weeks in a quarter. Hmm, do you think that’s by accident? No, I have one week each week to each quarter to really deep dive in different ways that we can connect with our clients, right. Some of them might be at events, and might be on zoom meetings, some might be in social media, and we start deep diving, it doesn’t mean we ignore the rest. But what we do is we look at ways that we connect with our clients. And then we look at ways that we can serve them in their client journey. So wherever we meet them, we want to meet them where their conversations already happening in their head. So one of the ways that we figure out who our ideal clients are, is we go to our friend, Amazon, and we look at all the books about that topic. So this is really stuff behind the scenes how to like, think about your client, right? So in the pet industry, I own a holistic hospital, it’s holistic, vet care, calm. And for holistic veterinary care, we have a book, it’s called the ultimate pet health guide. So I’ll go in, and I’ll look at our reviews from our clients and from the people who read it, I’ll go into our reviews at work when people get a response after their meeting, we have about 25,000 in person transactions per year. So the clients get a way of sending back feedback, I’ll read those, right. And what I’ll do is I’ll see in the language, the conversation that’s happening, and in their language, I now know how to understand what the marketplace needs. So even when I go on Amazon, I can look at other books that other authors have written around topics. It could be around nutrition, it could be around whatever it is that I want to know, I can read the reviews in their books. And I can see what people write about that’s important to them, either good or bad. The one star reviews tell me the most amount of information ever, because I see what they want. They’re usually saying I want this, but I got this and there’s a gap. That’s huge for me to do research in my industry of what is important on the client’s mind. I’ll tell you one thing that’s happening right now, and I’m seeing in threads and Facebook, and I’m seeing on Facebook Lives as people are starting to go back to work. And they’re saying that their dogs and their cats miss them so much. And now they’re getting a little bit of anxiety and what can they do, because their pet used to rest all day long. But now that they’re leaving their pets wondering when they’re going to come back, it’s different behavior, and they hadn’t planned for it. So now I’m talking to vendors around Hey, how can we help with anxiety, and I learned about a company called whole tones who o le whole tones, where you can get music to download and play for them while you’re gone. But the music made for pets to be more relaxed. So now somebody paid attention to this need and is filling it right. So that’s one of the things that’s happening is I’m listening to my clients through their reviews on books through their reviews on their visits. I’m meeting them with the things that they want. And those one star two star reviews, while they might be painful, whether they’re for me or someone else, there’s learning there. There’s learning that now one of the things I’ve also learned is the person who puts up the one star review, leave it up for a word a week, that person who needs the learning, they got the learning, you don’t have to leave it there forever. It’s a tarnish mark that you need 100 more five star reviews to make up for it. So you can leave it there a week they saw it, and maybe reread it and give them a better review and say, You know what, I think you’ve got the message. And here’s the good thing I took away, because there’s probably something good too. So I did learn that as well. Like there’s two sides to it, like the Creator who put 10s of 1,000’s of hours into that book doesn’t need someone to give away one star review. The other thing that I learned is in medicine, it’s hard for us to take a one star review to unless it’s another doctor saying hey, that doctor, because how could you judge medicine unless you’re in medicine. So here they’re writing a review and my team’s like, but that’s just their customer service. That’s not medicine, and we’re here for medicine. And yes, we want to do great customer service. But again, leave that review up for a week we got it, please don’t tarnish it and make it forever the team. The team got the message right away, you know? So it’s an interesting two sides of it. One is the consumer and one is the the person who’s delivering the value, right? We always want it to be great. And when it’s not we can learn but at the same time, how do we be in it together to make it even better? Right?

Alan
Should a brand try to be on every social media platform? Are there some platforms better than others?

Lee
You’re so so smart and asking that question. It’s a big one that I get asked all the time, and I’m on clubhouse right now, which is one of those new things that people are like, How much time do I spend on clubhouse, and I do limit it to a certain amount of time per day. And I absolutely love it. And I’m having fun. And I’m building a great network. However, there is there are some rules about this. So I’ve been in social media. I started with the I was at Stanford, and I was working with companies that had 50 to $100 million a year in budget to do outreach in marketing. And so these are huge companies, you know, $100 million back then was a lot of money. This is like 1998 1999, the year 2,000. And so what happened during that time, they started taking half their budget and going online. And I was like what was this online thing started with Yelp, all of a sudden, Yelp was getting all of this investment and time and energy. It was a review site. And it’s a love hate relationship. As I just mentioned to you, as a vendor, we love it and hate it. At the same time. However, it was one of the beginnings of having a two way dialogue and reviews and should you be in or not. And I learned if the companies were taking 50% of their budget and going online, I needed to pay attention and start going online as well. So I started working at Stanford Research Institute in an e-learning forum. We were bringing e learning companies out, I learned so much about education, MIT and Stanford, and Harvard all were in there. Together, companies from our universities from other places came in, they collaborated, they thought about it. And I started seeing it was important. So what I’ve learned over the years is this have a plan for how you want to meet your audience. Like I said, I have 13 ways. One of them is social media. In the social media, we expand on why don’t we have at least a profile in each of these places so people can find us but we can redirect them to our main place. Whether it’s a website or a blog, I recommend it your blog, because your blog goes everywhere with you forever. Whereas even clubhouse I might have a profile now and have a 10,000 people following me but it doesn’t mean I’ll be on clubhouse for other ever and if I’m not, I might lose them right whereas on my website, I have their emails they opt in for gifts, we can build relationships. Actually, you know what I learned to get club instead? of.com because a club pass I got Lee Richter club I got go ask League club I’m developing clubhouse bonus.com clubhouse bonus com clubhouse bonus club. And I’m developing like ways to have fun with the clubhouse community, but still keep them in my future ecosystem. So my point is this. Be in the places you want to be have a profile, at least have something there and then you can develop how much more time you want to deep dive. So on the week of when I really deep dive on social media per quarter, we make our plan for the next quarter. How much do we want to show up in each thing, like right now? We’re doing Tick Tock videos all the time in the pet space that started because of COVID. Last March, my team was coming in. I’m like, Hey, we can’t see clients, but we can do tic Tock videos. So they started having fun and they started to flip the switch videos and all of a sudden they’re laughing and I’m like wow, during COVID My team is laughing why cuz they’re making tic Tock videos. They were having a blast. And they still are and they’re teaching and now they’re teaching how tos, because they’ve learned that’s the thing now is just do a demonstration. How to do something, how to brush your dog, how to take your dog for a swim, how to groom your dog, whatever it is, they get to add value, have fun, they’re super creative. And they get to be more creative because of this platform, so fits them. So we’re doing more of it, right. But over a year ago, chicktech was not on our plan. And it wasn’t in our day, but because of the timing. And now we’re seeing the attraction. And I’m seeing the side effects of the team being excited feeling their creative. I also have team members that meet me in clubhouse, and they’re like, Oh, my God, every time I’m in there, I learned so much. So we’re learning as well. But what I have learned is to at least put your profile up there make it easy for people to find you. Can I share one other learning lesson I had a few years ago. And I’d say it’s probably like eight or nine years ago when Pinterest was first starting, right? And all of a sudden, all these people were doing pictures. And I’m like, oh, in the pet industry. That’s perfect for the pet industry. And I hear about it from stage at Jeff Walker. And he had shaylee was on there who’s famous all the time. I see her on TV all the time now. But here’s in the beginning of her career, and she’s talking about this thing, you know, Pinterest and how she shares pictures, and then how she’s doing some videos and how she’s building her business. Why come back to my team? And I’m like, we should do a Pinterest page and do all of our pictures. They’re like, Yeah, let’s do that. Let’s do that. We and they all had Pinterest pages. And they never even told me I’m like, why didn’t you guys even tell me about this, like, Oh, we didn’t think about and I’m like, woo, doesn’t mean you have to wait for me for having all the ideas. You can have them and bring them to me too. So I learned that open it up for the team to learn things and play around and bring them to you. That opened me up for more creativity with them by saying that like oh, next time Tell me. But the other thing that happened was I put up profiles for myself. And I put up one for my PR marketing company. But I didn’t put one up for the business for holistic vet care anything yet. I was checking through my PR marketing company. And at that time, literally September 1, they said okay, no more business accounts. And because I had the PR marketing company, I had the Pinterest business account, but all the other ones I missed out. And I’m like, oh, if I just done a placeholder. And I learned in that moment, think of it as a billboard, like go and just have the Billboard and the billboard could direct somewhere else, but at least have the placeholder. Because if they change the rules, you want to be on the grandfathered side in if you can. And after that I was like wow, holistic vet care missing a business Pinterest board was so big, I can never make it up again. So we now are doing it in tik tok in other places. But there was a big gap where I felt Oh, I wish I didn’t miss the boat and I knew better. So that’s my advice to you is to at least put the billboard up, maybe you redirect to where you might have your blog, or your podcasts or your video blogger, or even your Facebook or whatever is your best audience that you’d like to connect with or your email, which is ideal. So if you have it up there, at least they can find you.

Alan
Before I get to the last topic, I want to I want to do a plug for your business. If a person wants to use your PR services, how do they go about reaching Lee Richter?

Unknown Speaker
Thanks for asking. And right now I have some masterminds and I do some coaching and I have some VIP days that I go in and one on one help companies. So I love that you asked that. And you can find me on GoAskLee.com. And there’s an opt in there you can get on my mailing list My team and I love following up with people and I do a thing called mentor moments where I just love sharing something that might spark the next idea, right? visionaries come in. And they add vision, vision, and one piece might spark the next idea and the next idea and the next idea. And then we call those moments stacking, right, which creates momentum. So I think I love working with other visionaries and seeing how big they can think. And then how they can take it back to their team and implement.

Alan
Okay, thank you, Lee. Thank you. And we’ll have that in the in the notes. So the transcript is sent via to so people can then click on the link.

Lee
Thank you. And actually my team put together some places where you can get free PR for your business, right? So here’s some places where you can get your news release or your story printed. My team uses it. They went go ask Lee calm slash free PR. We’ll send you those notes as well go athlete calm slash free PR. And this way they can have the notes like here’s some things you can do right now. Get a news release out, share a story, connect with your ideal client through your story. Because when they see you and hear your story, they’ll see themselves and say, Oh, I need to know that person. And when it’s the right timing, you’ll be ready.

Alan
Alright, this last area I want to go into is kind of a big evolving area. It deals with crypto, and there’s things that crypto tokens, cryptocurrencies and if t all sorts of new technology, new terminology. And I’d like you to walk us through new things like what is a crypto token? What is an NFT? You know, how do people use these in their marketing strategies?

Lee
Well, I love that you asked that question because just yesterday I was on with my cane eggs. I heard him tell a story about a year ago, a client said, may I pay you in Bitcoin? I tried paying other ways, and I’m having a problem with having the money converted to US dollars is okay if I just pay with Bitcoin. And then he’s like, sure, and he paid them. And it was equivalent to $10,000 at the time. And he said recently, he checked that wallet, and it was over $60,000 in value now. So that that was able to grow like not only did his knowledge grow of it, but he saw witness of Wow, when I was open to saying yes to something that was different. It actually benefited me greatly. But it also opened the gateway for him to think differently, and then offer it to other people. Right. And so it brought him in the game. And so I started learning cryptocurrency in 2015. I was at an meeting with Peter Diamandis, his abundance 360. And he had a prize when he came back from, from lunch, he would pull names, and when you won, you got to choose something. And one of the choices was one bitcoin. And another choice was, you know, like, basically VR glasses. And another one was a robotic thing that came around with a screen and you had all these choices. And I was standing next to Dave Asprey and they called my name and I went on stage and my friends are like, of course take the one bitcoin and I think at the time is less than $500 it was just it but still seemed like a lot. like wow, 500 for one bitcoin, but at the moment, I’m like, really those VR glasses? Nope, no, take them on Bitcoin. But then it forced me to know how to open a wallet to accept the Bitcoin and understand the language, right. And at that moment, I started seeing like, this is an alternate universe. This is interesting. Let me learn more. And through the Peter de Montes group, he would bring people in to talk about it, including the founder of Ethereum, came in and launched Ethereum and told us about that, and it was barely $1 at the time, it was just in the beginning of all of this. And it was interesting, and I brought it to my team, and I’m like, let’s do an auto pay. And let’s start, you know, building up our things. And I all of a sudden, we had six Bitcoin and it was still growing. And so then all of a sudden, I just didn’t pay attention to it much longer. I just got busy with my life. And my husband got on PBS for a show and all of these other things were happening in the media, we got 50 Media hits in like, less than a year where we were like Martha Stewart and Reader’s Digest and just so many things, that taking care of real business, you know, overshadowed this Bitcoin thing. Well, as it grows, I start realizing it’s growing and growing, growing people like Cameron, Harold are like 30,000. He’s like, Is it still worth buying? And I see everyone talking about it. So I’m in it more than a minute more. And then, because of clubhouse, I started learning about crypto even more, because there’s these concentrated groups. And then I started learning about the NFT market, which is a fungible token, as Dan Sullivan has told us in our groups, a fungible token and then a non fungible token. So an NF T is a non fungible token. And to understand the comparison of what an NFT is, and I’ll come back to that definition that we know the simple one, but fungible token, the number one fungible token in the planet is a US $100 bill. And that means it’s a physical bill. It’s duplicated, there’s many of them, but it’s also seen as a currency that’s global, and you can use it anywhere in any country, you will be able to have the value of a $1 bill, but there’s more $100 bills on the planet, from the US than anything else. So that’s a fungible token. A non fungible token is a digital version, and there’s a one of a kind, there’s only one, there’s only one so you can have multiples different colors, but they’re numbered and they have digital addresses that are different. So what’s happened is the non fungible tokens, the NF T’s is its own marketplace. And the way I personally see it is it’s an access item. So I have one client, he runs the Comic Con, Comic Con is where the comic favors and people that love that, that industry that that world come together and he has sold more than 5 million tickets for 181 events in person. And people would have a ticket they get into the into the show. If you don’t have a ticket you don’t get in, right. So there’s the haves and the have nots, there’s who has access who does not right. If you have access, you get in he had a waiting list at every single venue. Always a waiting list people wanted to get in they couldn’t get in. But with a non fungible token and if t it’s still an access ticket, that’s how I see it. You might sell 100 of them and each person has access either online or in person. But it’s access to something else. So not only is it the art, it could be the art, but it also can be tokenized. And have a way a digital address that follows it that allows you to have access to something. So I’ve seen in, in several industries, including there are people that are selling access to custom sneakers, or custom shoes, Louis Vuitton, anyone can do a customized token where you can go in and buy it generally trade a cerium. By the way, that’s the token that’s used for the majority of NFT transactions. At this moment, things are opening up where there might be credit card and other platforms that take other things. However, right now, Ethereum is usually the choice or Bitcoin. But what and then the wax wallet, you have to trade to wax, but you have to go out of the country and come back. And so there’s all these different things to know for each platform. And we have minted NF T’s which means created and put for sale for sale. On several platforms, I think we’ve successfully minted about six platforms, like rare herbal, there’s all these different platforms where you can go open See, Foundation, you can go and put your NFT for sale, right. So the process is a designer or creator creates an NFT, you choose a platform, you meant it, you have it there, which means it’s a one of a kind, it’s got a digital address. And then people can come in, generally they trade Ethereum, and they can buy and purchase that access, right, they get that digital art, some people are putting it on a computer and letting a roll with other digital art. Some people are owning it and using it in different ways. And some people are using it just to be the creator and user of that I see people on clubhouse using the NFT art that they bought as now their picture for clubhouse so you can see them, you know, investing in other NFT artists and then they post that picture as their profile picture. So people could use it different ways. For me, I’m seeing it as access. So in the instance of Comic Con, what would it be like if you get the single NFT. And not only do you have access to the event, but now you have access to one of the characters that you get to meet in person, maybe in San Diego or whatever. Because you own that when the world opens up again, and we have the celebrities there, your NFT might get you access to behind the curtain or to a VIP experience. So that kind of thing is going to be really fun to share in the future.
Alan
And it seems like it’s also coming in stronger as an alternative to currency that we’ve known.

It’s definitely you know, one of the things that I noticed with the 100 million mastermind that I was with in Miami last week when these people are big thinkers, but they’re making over $100 million a year in their company. So they have money to invest. A lot of these are in cryptocurrency and have been for years, they’re also seeing the people that are 16 years and younger, they don’t have to wrap their head around it, they just live it and so they’re going to take off past us. And what they said in that room is there’s more 16 year old billionaires being made right now, because they’re open not only open to this, they don’t have to recondition and rethink it and think it’s confusing, they just do it. And my daughter’s in that group of 16. And I see they really do have a, they can do anything they want, especially online, and they’re going to understand this code, they’re going to understand this world, and we need to be paying attention. And we need to be in this with them. Right. And there are some people that are leading it, and I just am paying attention. Transcribed by: otter.ai

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